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The Blues Is Celtic

The Blues Is Celtic

Postby EzraLB » Sun Sep 27, 2015 5:55 am

I've been telling people for years that Blacks did not invent The Blues, that they stole it from hearing the Scotch-Irish singing their traditional music in the American South. Niggers never invented anything of value, but the Jews would have us believe that the Jigs invented The Blues and Jazz out of thin air because they are such musical geniuses. But all you have to do is listen to any Rap or Jazz song to know it's all based on theft from other sources.

Personally, I've never liked Black Blues--I find it primitive, repetitive, and monotonous. Jews have brainwashed everyone into believing that rock 'n roll is based mainly on the blues--even most famous rock musicians will refer to some Jig blues player as one of their early influences. But if you listen to rock, it is completely different from the blues--the rhythm, the style, the subject matter is all different--and it is implicitly White.

Van Morrison, whom I consider an implicitly White musician and whose music clearly comes out of the Celtic and Christian tradition, admitted in this following interview that, in fact, the blues are originally based on Celtic musical traditions. I know of no other musician of his stature to make that politically-incorrect assertion. Good for him for daring to state the obvious. You can skip ahead in the video to about 5:30 in where he's asked the question about the blues.

"No Rothschild is English. No Baruch, Morgenthau, Cohen, Lehman, Warburg, Kuhn, Kahn, Schiff, Sieff or Solomon was ever born Anglo-Saxon. And it is for this filth that you fight. It is for this filth that you murdered your Empire. It is this filth that elects, selects, your politicians." -- Ezra Pound
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Re: The Blues Is Celtic

Postby Fenwick » Sun Sep 27, 2015 6:40 am

I've long said that our modern pop music is a fusion of old European folk music and American country music.

I'm not a massive fan of blues but you can clearly see the influence of the old celtic lament music in it.
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Re: The Blues Is Celtic

Postby Staropramen » Sun Sep 27, 2015 7:55 am

I too have been saying this for years. Great find!
"If God is a Jew then the only thing left for us to do is commit suicide"
-Dr. Wesley A. Swift
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Re: The Blues Is Celtic

Postby Gaius » Sun Sep 27, 2015 9:29 am

Thanks, Ezra, for posting up this vdo discussion.
I also agree on the origin of Blues music.
Interesting to hear his take on the '60's ... that folk were expected to abandon their roots then ... in defiance of this he sings in Celtic Ray --
" ... Ireland, Scotland, Britain and Wales
I can hear those ancient voices calling, children, children ... "
What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be against us?
(Romans 8 v 31)
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Re: The Blues Is Celtic

Postby Staropramen » Sun Sep 27, 2015 12:05 pm

"If God is a Jew then the only thing left for us to do is commit suicide"
-Dr. Wesley A. Swift
Historical Recordings of interest to Christians;
http://historicalrecordings.net/
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Re: The Blues Is Celtic

Postby Gaius » Sun Sep 27, 2015 12:53 pm

Nice vdo, Staro.
Séamus Ennis (d. 1982) " is recognised for having preserved almost 2,000 Irish songs and dance-tunes as part of the work he did with the Irish Folklore Commission.[2]

Ennis is widely regarded as one of the greatest uilleann pipers of all time.[2] ..."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%A9amus_Ennis

Here's one that the title is close ... Carrickfergus is a few miles up from Belfast ... one of the places of legendary landing of Jeremiah the Prophet and Baruch/Brugh ...
Van the Man sings the Blues, many themes in this relate to the Celt ..
Many of our people wanderers from town to town ... drunk today ... lost ...
Wishing to be back in Carrickfergus ...

What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be against us?
(Romans 8 v 31)
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Re: The Blues Is Celtic

Postby Staropramen » Wed Sep 30, 2015 8:31 am

I posted this video on a music forum I frequent. One nutter posted this rant;

Well, because it's not true. Morrison is incorrect.

Sure, the blues is a new world music and a melting pot music -- it was the invention of African Americans in the new world and possibly didn't even coaelesce in the form with think of it as today until the earliest years of the 20th century, although though it had predecessors in music going back to the colonial era of slavery -- the ring shouts and the corn husking songs and the work songs.

While those antecedents were not entirely immune from the influence of Anglo and European music in the new world -- the slave population heard Anglican hymns, local white vernacular music, the best musicians played the dances for the white folks, learning their music and styles -- they hae explicit and direct connection to West African traditions -- the modal and antiphonal stuctures, the partially flatten thirds and sevenths, the rhythmically floating leads over a ground beat, etc.

There are musical similarities between some of the Africanisms that survived in African American music from the 1600s on down and traditional Irish music. Partially flatted third, fifths and sevenths show up in traditional Irish music, for example, just as crucially as the to in African American music. But Irish music isn't the source for them in African American music. They existed in African American music from the time Africans were forceably brought to the Americas, and long before the big Irish influx to the new world. And of course antiphonal structures appear in all kinds of folk music of a wide variety of cultures --European music again isn't the source for that structure in African American music; that's just kind of a universal aspect found in music.

But the Anglican hymns and spirituals that Morrison is citing here don't have the modal melodies, the partially flatted notes, the irregular rhythm structures of blues as it developed in Mississippi, Texas, Arkansas, Missouri in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They're not the source of blues even if they may be an input music. In what ways does "Abide with Me" seem like Handy's "Yellow Dog Blues" or even Blind Willie Johnson's "Dark Was the Night"? (Of course I know Abide with Me is not an old traditional song and only goes back to mid 19th century, but harmonically, structurally, with its underlying William Henry Monk music, it's pure English spiritual.)

There's also other European music that has the mournful, modal quality of the blues, like flamenco, but that's a music that bears a strong African influence -- both a North African influence on its in situ development in Andalusia, and a new world African influence via African slaves held by Spanish owners and the writing in the 16th century of "negrazillas" and "zarambesques" that were deliberate adoptings of African notions into flamenco styles. So the African influence on European music is part of this story too.

You gotta remember the Atlantic slave trade began in the 1520s, and yes it began in Portugal, so Morrison's citing of Portugal as a place were this kind of cultural exchange accelerated is correct. From that point forward the transmission of musical influence in both directions -- from African to European and from European to African -- began. So who influenced who and how and when can be tricky to unwind.

Blues as a specific musical form doesn't show up in any recognizable way in the historical record until around 1900, though it probably had to predate that, and obviously had predecessor musics in the ring shouts and corn husking songs and work songs, and folkloric dance music -- and there's plenty of writing about what African music sounded like in the new world going back to the 1600s. Dana Epstein's Sinful Tunes and Spirituals: Black Folk Music to the Civil War, is a pretty good survey of the early writings about and attempts to catalogue what that music sounded like. By the time blues develops in the US, 350 years after Africans are forceably bought to North America, there's a whole distinct tradition of African American music peculiar to the African American population (and remember while in the Carribbean, on sugar plantations, slaves were often worked to death, and new slaves continually brought in from Africa, with the West African musical styles staying very much close to the surface of musics like rumba and the music and religious tradition of something like Santaria; in North America the slave population largely grew by birth, and by the days of the early republic African Americans were a very distinct population whose families had been on the continent for generations and who had a distinct culture that was neither African nor European but was American). So, while there's no doubt European influences to be found in African American music circa 1900. I think the attempt to claim a European wellspring for the blues, as THE source of blues, is barking up the wrong tree -- both an over simplification and possibly reflective of some kind of need white, European singers of the blues might feel to prove some kind of bona fides in singing blues.


I conferred with EzraLB and he sent me a response. This being a PC board I had to sanitize it a bit;

This post strikes me as the rankest sort of Cultural Marxist hairsplitting, deconstructing ideas down to the point where they no longer have any meaning. This argument insists on the primacy of the African musical “tradition” where there really wasn’t one. One of the aspects of the African psyche that struck the early European explorers and missionaries is how little concept the Africans had of the past, of any traditions handed down in their "culture". They lived solely in the moment, no past, no future. They didn't have the word "why" in their vocabulary. That's not hard to understand when you realize they had IQs of 60 or 70. And the early slaves were no different. I find it hard to believe that any slave living in the American South after one or two generations had any cultural memory of any musical traditions of their ancestors.

I would argue that the atonality concepts of “artists” such as Arnold Schoenberg and Joseph Marx, which came after the blues were projected onto the history of Black musical traditions to give them a theoretical legitimacy that they don't have


This kook then posted an even more incoherent response about the legitimacy of griots reinventing history with every generation. I just went there to post "yeah, like Alex Haley, LOL!" but alas, the thread has been removed. Poof! Gone without a trace. At least I wasn't banned! Heck I wasn't even reprimanded.
"If God is a Jew then the only thing left for us to do is commit suicide"
-Dr. Wesley A. Swift
Historical Recordings of interest to Christians;
http://historicalrecordings.net/
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Re: The Blues Is Celtic

Postby Gaius » Wed Sep 30, 2015 11:02 am

Thanks for posting it on, Staro.
And to Ezra for comment to the nutter
It's amusing to read the desperate ranting of people whose cultural-marxist blather reads like flower power. The sun has set on that pseudo bullshit, and they know it ... perhaps others drew conclusions about a long rant on flatted notes and the slave-trade ... that shite is getting very old ...
Alex Haley ... LOL ...

Van the Man again in a different mood, from Avalon Sunset (his 19th album, issued 1989)
(especially for the ranting poster ... :D )

What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be against us?
(Romans 8 v 31)
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Re: The Blues Is Celtic

Postby EzraLB » Wed Sep 30, 2015 3:03 pm

Thanks, Gaius for the reminder--Van Morrison has so many explicitly Christian songs, which probably drives the Jews nuts. One of the great Christian songs he wrote is "Have I Told You Lately," which a lot of people think is just a traditional love ballad when, in fact, he's singing to Christ. Forget about Rod Stewart's cheesy version; Van's is the only one worth listening to.

The original video for "Have I Told You Lately" was shot in Ireland and has some beautiful footage of the landscape. All the faces in the video are White--it's hard to believe that they could make that video today and not show the "Irish" Nigerians and Arabs. It slipped under the PC-Police's radar. It's clearly "racist". :roll:

"No Rothschild is English. No Baruch, Morgenthau, Cohen, Lehman, Warburg, Kuhn, Kahn, Schiff, Sieff or Solomon was ever born Anglo-Saxon. And it is for this filth that you fight. It is for this filth that you murdered your Empire. It is this filth that elects, selects, your politicians." -- Ezra Pound
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Re: The Blues Is Celtic

Postby Meggie » Wed Sep 30, 2015 10:50 pm

Thanks for the info and thumbs up to the Van man. He's long been my favorite musician. He's never been one to tow the Jewish line in music. Thanks again.


My favorite Van tune:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xbvq2c98nY

from that song:

I want to go out in the countryside
Oh sit by the clear, cool, crystal water
Get my spirit, way back to the feeling
Deep in my soul, I want to feel
Oh so close to the One, close to the One
Close to the One, close to the One
BBE Jeremiah 50:2 Give it out among the nations, make it public, and let the flag be lifted up; give the word and keep nothing back; say, Babylon is taken, Bel is put to shame, Merodach is broken, her images are put to shame, her gods are broken.
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